Listening to the Distance: Eagle

Yolande Harris (University of California, Santa Cruz, USA)

yo@yolandeharris.net

http://yo@yolandeharris.net

ABSTRACT:

‘Listening to the Distance’ (2013-15) is series of video, sound and image works that explore how we can experience and share distant environments, through animal visions, remote presence and underwater sound. Listening to the Distance weaves together Yolande Harris’ artwork with her theories of techno-intuition and sonic consciousness, in which expanded forms of awareness emerge through technological media, sensory experience and critical listening techniques. ‘Eagle’ (2015) combines video of bald eagles with sea-glider sounds to explore a journey to spaces of mind that lie beyond everyday reality. Light Entering My Room (2015) fills a room with moving light revealing shadows cast through trees in an old growth rainforest in the Pacific Northwest US.

“Through my work I question the relationship between my embodied experience, technological mediation, and my conceptual understanding of planetary scale, remote environments and the life that inhabits them. What happens if I try to re-place remote sound within a contrasting context, so that it can form an active relationship to that environment, perhaps allowing us to experience a sense of remote presence? My hope is to unearth, or reconnect to, a dormant understanding of the interconnectedness of global ecologies.”

DESCRIPTION:

Eagle

‘Eagle’ (2015) uses video, sound and images to explore a journey to spaces of mind that lie beyond everyday reality. The eagle is the guide to this other space, and the artist peers into the distance through layered lenses, allowing light seepage and time shifts, to record this journey through a crack in consciousness. The video and images search through the psyche to the intuitive landscapes perhaps inhabited by other beings (birds, whales) and archetypes (water, mountains). The images explore a blur and disruption of clear vision, the confines of a frame and motion, of trying to focus but being unable to, of scanning the land and sea, looking for … what? The close-up image and sense of searching is contrasted with the expansive space of long distance sounds. Listening to the electronic and acoustic sounds of a robotic sea-glider as it tracks through the ocean recording its environment, one enters the zone of drone sounds, occasionally hearing the calls of whales. Combining the technological glitches of the robot’s sounds with the layered looking through lenses and projections, the work searches for a portal that allows us to extend our senses beyond the functional reality of technologies. The still images ‘Eyrie’ complement the experience of the large-scale videos by isolating individual frames in order to create a quality of timelessness and non-linearity. The complex drone-like environmental sounds focus the mind and create a space of intimacy from which to explore the individual frames and the visual possibility of time and journeying in stillness.

Light Entering My Room

“Light Entering My Room fills a space in which the only sound was truly ‘ambient’—the noise of the adjacent shopping mall coming as close to silent as the gallery allows. Here two corners of a dark room are lit by dim, cool light, as if by the moon (or perhaps a street light). The scene is warmed up by the dancing, wind-blown shadows cast by trees or shrubs. I was reminded of riding in the backseat of my parents’ car late at night, watching passing lights sweep over the car’s interior. Such ambient, accidental light forms an analog to ambient sound. Conventionally ignored in favor of illuminated stimulation, such lights have the power to calm the agitated modern psyche.”(from exhibition review by Geoff Wichert)

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:

Yolande Harris works with sound and image to create intimate and visceral experiences that heighten awareness of our relationship to the environment. Her projects consider techniques of navigation, worlds beyond the range of human senses, underwater environments and our relationship to other species. Through video installations and performances, photographic prints, digital instruments, sound walks, performative lectures and writings, she integrates her artwork and theories of techno- intuition and sonic consciousness, in which expanded forms of awareness emerge through a critical use of media, observation and listening.

Yolande’s exhibitions include the ICA London, MACBA Barcelona, Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt and the House of World Cultures Berlin. Awards and fellowships include the Mondriaan Fonds; Academy of Media Arts, Cologne; Orpheus Research Center, Ghent; Jan van Eyck Academy, Maastricht. She holds a PhD from Leiden University, an MPhil from Cambridge University and a BA from Dartington College of Arts. Her doctoral dissertation Scorescapes: on Sound, Environment and Sonic Consciousness, was awarded Best Doctoral Abstract by the Journal Leonardo. Yolande was Assistant Professor in the Film/Animation/Video Department at Rhode Island School of Design, and is currently teaching in the Digital Arts and New Media graduate program at the University of California, Santa Cruz

 

Climate and Art: Timescales and Extreme Events

 

Andrew Kruczkiewicz & Pablo Suarez (International Research Institute for Climate and Society / Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre)

ajk2207@columbia.edu  

ABSTRACT:

The success of climate risk management, or any type of risk management, hinges on linking knowledge with action. Regrettably, there are many reasons why organizations fail to turn available risk information into successful decisions to act. Acting on the assumption that people and organizations are rational actors, the majority of resources associated with the development of climate risk management systems are dedicated to technical aspects (such as data accuracy, timely access, decision support systems). The volition to act (or not) is controlled by deeper layers of perception and understanding of risk; layers related to trust, emotions and motivations.

Evidence shows that better outcomes, relative to risk management systems that link knowledge to action, are achieved by embedding information in participatory processes that engage our deeper senses. Music and art has been used for generations to influence people’s understanding and behavior, from commercial jingles that trigger shopping impulses, to brass marches that mobilize soldiers so they want to go to war.

The notion of climate as art will be explored through a mixed media format consisting of abstract audio and visual forms. Pulsations, striations, hesitation and uncertainty; each will be probed in this piece involving both recorded and live artistic forms.

DESCRIPTION:

This piece will be a continuation in a series of presentations with the first in the Netherlands in September 2016, the second in Geneva in December 2016. For the first time, the performance will feature live music.

Conversely, in consideration of risks associated with climate and weather, entities equally ubiquitous as music, there is a much less ubiquitous emotional response. Like music, risks are dynamic; similarly characterized by crescendos and diminuendos, harmonies and dissonances, calls and responses, tensions and resolutions, anticipation and surprise. But, in contrast to music, analytically rigorous climate data offers to people and organizations much less potential to resonate with patterns and emotions, and ultimately, less chance for motivating action. This exploration of the relation-ship of climate and music will be presented here as first, a device to convey the differences between weather and climate across various timescales. Next, we outline the first steps towards development of a new, more emotionally-pegged, modality to communicate climate to incite humanitarian preparedness action.

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHIES:

Andrew Kruczkiewicz: Andrew is interested in the role of satellites and remote sensing technology for sector-specific applications. This includes developing algorithms to detect and map spatial and temporal patterns of precipitation, temperature and other climatic variables and analyzing their impact on agriculture and public health. He is also interested in the intersection of the social and physical sciences, especially pertaining to the integration of remote sensing into early warning systems for extreme events such as floods, storm surge from tropical cyclones, wildfires and landslides. At the IRI, Kruczkiewicz is part of the Environmental Monitoring Program and aids in the development and integration of environmental remote sensing products into early warning systems for human health, agriculture and natural disasters. For the Red Cross Red Crescent Climate, he is holds the position of Science Advisor, specializing in flood risk management and exploring innovative approaches to communicate climate risk. He is also a drummer.

Pablo Suarez: Pablo got involved with the Climate Centre as a technical adviser in 2005. He now directs our initiatives linking applied knowledge with humanitarian work, as well as new approaches to climate risk management.
Examples include participatory games for learning and dialogue, and the forecast-based financing pilots in Togo and Uganda – the use forecasts of extreme events to trigger disbursement of funds for action before a disaster occurs, reducing avoidable losses. Pablo holds a first degree in water engineering, a master’s in community planning and development, and a PhD in geography.

He has advised humanitarian and development organizations in more than 50 countries, and also researches and teaches at University of Lugano, University College London, and Boston University.

The Great Forest of Plymouth: Triptych

 

Shaun Lewin (Batwick Productions, UK)

sionlewin@gmail.com 

ABSTRACT:

The urban wildscape is fractal in scale, persisting in the interstices of capitalism’s topologically lax exploitation of the biosphere, with the twinned productions of solar energy capture and property speculation generating a dynamic building-wilderness mosaic. The popular conception of wilderness as conceptualised by the Romantics and reified by the mass media has not engaged with this Anthropocene wilderness; as a consequence, the main reservoir of future biodiversity has no narrative, only benign neglect.

The wilderness of the Romantics was one of quantitative affect, where grand vistas evoked the Sublime. The new wilderness is a qualitative one, determined by an unknown number of non-human agents sifting through their immediate environment for useful habitat components.

Daniel Raven-Ellison’s work on guerrilla geography suggests a means of transitioning from quantitative to qualitative wilderness. This work borrows Ellison’s technique of socioeconomic mountaineering and uses it to define a transect of the wilderness that is situated on a continuum of socioeconomic production. In an attempt to avoid a naïve ontology, three discrete definitions of wilderness are employed: remote sensing techniques, crowd sourced mapping and legislative definitions. This transect will be used to collect georeferenced audio-visual data that will be presented as a live performance.

DESCRIPTION:

This project employs a GPS informed walk along a literalised rendering of trickle down economics as a means of generating an affective cartography of urban wilderness as defined by three unrelated classification systems. The results of this investigation will then disseminated through the medium of scored live performance.

  1. A map of Plymouth’s Multiple Indices of Deprivation is converted into a 2.5D model where deprivation is represented as elevation.
  2. Using surface flow modelling techniques, a route is generated describing the journey between the highest and lowest point in this deprivation-scape. This route will be referred to as the transect in the remainder of this document. This transect is converted into a file format suitable for mobile mapping platforms
  3. Three data sources are collated and converted into a format suitable for use on a mobile mapping platform. These data are analysed and average patch size is determined. The radius of the average patch’s bounding circle will be used to determine the sampling interval described in stage 4 (below)
    1. Satellite imagery from the ESA’s sentinel programme is analysed using a super classification technique that identifies areas of greenspace.
    2. Natural spaces data from Open Street Map.
    3. Plymouth City Council’s Open Data on urban green space
  4. Using an android handset and probably the app OSMAnd the transect is walked across Plymouth.This walk will be repeated three times, once for each definition of wilderness (as defined in step 3). When the mobile handset indicates that the transect has entered an area of green space, audio- visual material will be collected at fixed (sampling) intervals until the transect leaves the ‘wilderness’ area.
  5. Each transect will be compiled into a continuous video and conceptualised as being representative of a continuous walk. A script will be created for each walk using text taken from National Park and nature reserve publicity materials
  6. A score will be generated as a means of translating the study from the spatial domain of the transect to the temporal domain of the performance. Two factors will be considered:
    a. the altitude of the sampling site upon the deprivation – elevation landscape.b. The green value of the most common colour in at that sampling point, when the image is analysed in the RGB colour space.
  7. Live Performance: 2 performers working with audio visual field recordings. All information used in the score will be displayed on screen. At moments determined by the score, parts of the script created at stage 5 will be read out.

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:

Shaun Lewin is a cartographer, conservationist and digital artist whose work ranges from spatial models of commercial fishing to audiovisual performances derived from youtube footage of people visiting neolithic sites. His cartographic work has led to work with Natural England, a range of participatory community mapping projects and the State. His work with Urbanomic reflects on these experiences and places them within a theoretical context.

Shaun has been active within the café concrete sound art collective since 2008. A number of works have been generated from this association including the concrete composition Roland Levinsky Building that was distributed by the Wire magazine and the film Inventory of Witchery that was debuted at Plymouth University’s Algofilm festival.

In 2011 Shaun worked as assistant composer for Alexis Kirke’s musical, Drive in Deco. This has led to an ongoing collaboration with the composer Michael McInerney that has had its most comprehensive expression in the AV

xirminja nahpy benry

 

Pablo Sanz (Sonic Arts Research Centre Belfast (SARC), Queen´s University Belfast, UK)

p@pablosanz.info

http://www.pablosanz.info

ABSTRACT:

xirminja nahpy benry is an immersion into the sonic environments of flooded tropical rainforests in the Brazilian Central Amazon. The work is based on an extensive series of spatial long-form recordings made over a several week period during the dry season of 2015 at multiple sites across the Mamirauá and Amanã Reserves. The installation consists of a durational sonic-spatial composition exploring the stunning complexity of the sonic mesh created by insects, birds, amphibians, fishes, reptiles, mammals, vegetational matter and water through a 24-hour cycle.

DESCRIPTION:

The work proposed for presentation at Balance-Unbalance 2017 is an immersive installation part of an emerging series of works based on sonic materials gathered during intensive fieldwork in the Central Amazon Region in 2015. The project is conceived as an ongoing series with multiple outputs (immersive installations and live performances) based on the creative exploration of ideas of distributed environmental sensing/recording and durational/spatial sonic perception through the use of specific spatial audio production techniques and compositional strategies. The project is framed in an ongoing creative practice focusing on non-human and materials agency with an interest to challenge prevalent notions of Nature which take the ‘environment’ as something ‘exterior’ to the Human and Culture.

The following section describes the ideas and creative process of the project, providing specific details about the fieldwork and studio-based compositional strategies.

The fieldwork took place at the Mamirauá and Amanã Reserves as part of a 3-month stay in Brazil in 2015. The two reserves are located approximately 600 km west of Manaus in the Médio Solimões region, a central area of the Brazilian state of Amazonas, and are joined by adjacent Jaú National Park to form a corridor spanning over 20,000 square miles (52,000 km2) of protected rainforest. The reserves are part of the Central Amazon Conservation Complex, a World Heritage site since 2000 which makes up the largest protected area in the Amazon Basin and is one of the planet’s richest regions in terms of biodiversity. This territory consists mostly of flooded forest and hosts more than 400 species of birds and at least 45 species of mammals. Two species of monkeys, the white uakari and the black squirrel monkey are endemic of this region. The reserves are also home for numerous fish species, the Amazon manatee, two species of river dolphins, a large diversity of amphibians, reptilians, insects and countless botanical species.

The fieldwork was conducted in cooperation with the Mamirauá Institute, the organization responsible to manage both reserves. The Institute, which is a not-for-profit organization funded and supervised by the Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, functions as one of the Ministry’s research units. Mamirauá Institute facilitated an extended stay in three scientific research stations they maintain in the reserves. The fieldwork was developed in collaboration with researchers and specialist field assistants from local communities, exploring areas across several kilometres surrounding each of the research stations. The fieldwork consisted in the collection of environmental sound recordings using a variety of specific location recording strategies to gather different types of sonic materials.

Fig. 1. Mamirauá and Amanã Reserves map with location of the three scientific bases visited.

Panoramic images taken during fieldwork in the reserves.

 

The source materials used in the project consist of a series of long-form recording produced with a methodology based on the use of multiple self-made omnidirectional units deployed simultaneously throughout specific chosen sites in relative proximity. Over the course of several weeks, different locations and types of environments (i.e. terra firma, flooded forests areas) were explored using this methodology, investigating the diverse manifestations of the biodiversity and sonic environments in the region. The unattended recording sessions produced an average of 12 continuous hours of sonic materials each, amounting for ca. 300 hours of raw material in total.

In the studio, the compositional process is based on a meticulous listening, analysis, editing and assembling of the sonic materials. Firstly, all the original recordings have been synchronised according to their original time-stamps in a 24-hour timeline and are explored as a multi-dimensional ‘sonic hyper- object’. The richness, variety and amount of materials produced allows to explore different compositional ‘pathways’ leading towards the eventual creation of multiple manifestations of the project based on spatial and temporal layering and recombination of clusters of fragments which are assembled into seamless immersive compositions. The projects uses Ambisonic production techniques which produce an enveloping and vidid spatial feeling and provide flexibility for playback in variable speaker setups and therefore the adaptation to different presentation contexts.

The most recent version of the work features a 6-hour 35min (∞) composition exploring a continuous 24- hour cycle. The installation was premiered in November 2016 at Sonorities Festival 2016, Belfast, UK using an eight-speaker configuration in pitch dark. Previous versions include an installation presented at Sonic Environments / ACMC 2016 Interdisciplinary Conference, Queensland Conservatorium, Brisbane, Australia in July 2016 and a quadraphonic live performance which took place in September 2016 at EARSHOTS! concert series, One Hundred Years Gallery, London, UK.

This project has been made possible thanks to several partners and supporters: Mamirauá Institute (Tefé, Amazonas), SARC-Sonic Arts Research Centre (Belfast), LASom-Laboratorio de Acústica e Artes Sonoras (São Paulo), T-37 (Madrid), Santander Foundation UK, Sound & Music UK.

 

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:

Pablo Sanz is an artist, composer and field recordist currently based in the UK. He makes site-specific projects, multichannel installations, immersive live performances, headphone pieces and publications. His activities are engaged with the exploration of aesthetic and spatial aspects of sonic perception, working primarily with environmental sound as raw material, extended listening technologies, architectural physical space and spatial audio strategies. Thresholds of human perception and the interrelations between non- humans, matter and phenomena are essential in his practice.

His work is presented internationally in a variety of contexts and has been awarded in the competition ‘Europe – A Sound Panorama’ (2011, Goethe Institute, Deutschlandradio Kultur, ZKM-Karlsruhe) and the ‘5th On-Air Radiophonic Art Prize’ (2009, Círculo de Bellas Artes, Madrid). He has been artist-in-residency at Inland-Campo Adentro (Catalonia), Matadero (Madrid), Nau Côclea (Girona), FDD (Lisbon), Sonoscopia (Porto), ARE Holland (Enschede), Q-O2 (Brussels), CONA-Institute for Contemporary arts Processing (Ljubljana) and LASom-Laboratory for Sonic Arts and Acoustics (São Paulo). Recent projects include field recording work in the Central Amazon region supported by Brazilian and British research organisations, site-specific architectural interventions in The Netherlands, Spain and Northern Ireland, radio commissions for Radio Reina Sofía Museum in Madrid, FON Air UK, Atelier de Création Sonore Radiophonique / Silence Radio in Belgium and online releases on Very Quiet Records (UK) and Sonic Terrain (Colombia) among others.

In 2004 he became an active member of the online publication mediateletipos.net, a collaborative independent initiative devoted to the dissemination of aural culture and sonic arts through which he contributed to several curatorial projects including commissioned programmes for Sónar Festival (Barcelona) and Sensxperiment (Córdoba). In 2007 he relocated to The Netherlands, completing studies at the Institute of Sonology and the ArtScience Interfaculty in the Royal Conservatory and the Royal Academy of Arts of The Hague. Since 2013 he is based at the Sonic Arts Research Centre (SARC) in Belfast, working towards a PhD in sonic arts practice (Sound~Space~Perception~Ecologies: Environmental Composition Approaches).

PHOENIX.WOLFANDDOTCOM.INFO

 

André Sier (s373.net/x, Portugal)

as@andre-sier.com

http://andre-sier.com

ABSTRACT:

Immerse your body in an abstract phoenix embodiment art construct simulator. Fly, dive, crash, and set fire to a daunting perilous cathartic virtual path at the dawn of extinction. PHOENIX.WOLFANDDOTCOM.INFO is a proto-videogame installation where users play and may become virtual mythological winged phoenixes, using full body invisible video interaction, within an environment over-populated with humans, obstacles, and scarce endangered organisms. Hatch yourself from burned previous life debris, learn how to fly and help the phoenix make its way to the sun city. Fly through escalating dangerous hordes of humans and obstacles that seek to prevent you from reaching the sun city. Only the phoenix can prevent the extinction.

DESCRIPTION:

PHOENIX.WOLFANDDOTCOM.INFO is a new work in progress by electronic artist André Sier within the wolfanddotcom series. It is a proto-videogame installation which investigates immersive interactive electronic pathways as bridges to non-human otherness, animal embodiment and cathartic gameplay. The works in this series attempt to subliminally shift human perception towards themes that affect us all on a global planetary and universal scale. Through invisible video interaction, using their camera tracked full body, users can become virtual mythological winged phoenixes in a proto-game interactive installation where they seek to prevent an inevitable extinction of endangered organisms and themselves.

The purpose of the installation is to create an art experience that is immersive, dynamic, interactive and above all fun to play. It also aims to create a virtual laboratory, and a phoenix simulator playfully playing with the theme around the current 6th mass extinction our planet endures caused mainly by human overpopulation – the Holocene extinction. This work comes in the lines of the awarded previous work DRACO.WOLFANDDOTCOM.INFO (http://andre-sier.com/wolfanddotcom/DracoWolfAndDotComInfo/) and will use similar invisible interface but with distinct interaction, functionality, gameplay,…

The wolfanddotcom series investigates immersive interactive electronic pathways as bridges to non-human otherness and embodiment. The wolfanddotcom series (Sier, 2011-), named after a creative combination of animality entwined with cyberspace, seeks to create experiences which expand human-body perception and consciousness by inducing a shift onto other species/bodies, by playfully inciting ilinx (Caillois, 1958) via altering and disrupting the perception of self, mediated through technology, algorithms, and custom human-computer interfaces. These cyber-environments thus become laboratories which operate as practical means of immersion of animal embodiment and a locus for study of human behavior. By forging a sense of otherness in the self, deepened into almost inhabiting other species, human users become more aware of their environment, and active listeners of their surroundings and of other lifeforms. Gifted with new senses, the player is now extended, transported inside the experience.

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:

André Sier is an artistic engineer with training in sciences, arts, degree in philosophy. Working since 1997 at s373.net/x studios, exhibits and performs works worldwide, with more than 25 solo exhibitions and over 80 participations at collective shows, festivals and artistic events. Sier works with code, 3D, video, sound, electronics, drawing, sculpture, videogames. Awarded at Jovens Criadores (2006), Bienal de Cerveira (2009), three times at Lisbon MakerFaire (2014,15,16). Sier underlines the series ‘struct’, ‘747’, ‘space race’, ‘k.’, ‘uunniivveerrssee’, ‘piantadelmondo’ and ‘wolfanddotcom’. Regular teacher of electronic interactive arts since 2002, invited assistant professor of digital arts at Universidade de Évora, he is currently doctoral student at Planetary Collegium.

 

Ecological Interference: Hybrid Soundscapes

 

Linda O Keeffe (United Kingdom Lancaster University)

l.okeeffe@lancaster.ac.uk 

http://www.lindaokeeffe.com

ABSTRACT:

This work is an artistic exploration of a paper submitted for this conference. The art work examines through video and sound the impact of renewable technologies on natural soundscapes. The work is responding to two field trips taken to Iceland and the Terra Alta Region of Northern Spain in the summer of 2015. During these two trips it was found that sounds produced by two technologies, hydroelectric power station and wind turbines, produced consistent low frequency sounds audible within the natural acoustic ecology. This work uses the recordings from these two different spaces, along with my voice and the sounds of technological interference to create a human/natural soundscape. The artwork is a response to how one can both critique the soundscape of these technologies and explore concepts around adaptation to new sonic environments.

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:

O Keeffe is a lecturer in sound studies at the Lancaster Institute for the Contemporary Arts, Lancaster University. She works as a sound artist and has created work for public installation, gallery exhibition, radio, dance and theatre. She is currently working on two sound projects, which explore gender issues in sound technology, and post colonialism in Ireland and Australia.

A Space to Wonder: Movement and Sound Interaction through Biosensor Technology.

 

Klara Łucznik (Cognovo, Plymouth University, Plymouth UK) and Abigail Jackson (Cognovo, Plymouth University, Plymouth UK)

klara.lucznik@plymouth.ac.uk
abigail.jackson@plymouth.ac.uk

http://www.cognovo.eu/people/research-fellows/klara-lucznik.php

ABSTRACT:

Our experiential installation investigates shared embodied knowledge, in particular kinesthetic empathy, in creative social environments by exploring the benefits of combining the disciplines of The Arts and Sciences. Utilizing biosensor technology, and cognitive science research, within a movement session designed for public engagement for participants with limited dance experience, opens a discussion on the facilitation of shared embodied knowledge and kinesthetic empathy.

Presenting this in a black-box dance studio invites participant’s senses to be heightened, whilst encourage trusting relationships. Introducing biosensor interfaces, through wearable breath- bands, allows the participants’ breathing patterns to be sonified as the soundscape throughout the session, giving the group a layered experience of their bodily movement. The sound landscape, combined with facilitated somatic movement practices, highlights movement and sound interaction explorations through movement with others, whilst offering a collaborative environment transferable to a variety of communities.

This collaborative research project, facilitated by Abigail and Klara, explores personal embodied knowledge and the role of kinaesthetic empathy, when understanding others through embodied knowledge. This workshop will emulate an Interactive Installation whilst furthering discussions about somatic movement, and the use of biosensors for movement and sound interaction in research applying technology to support and understand human movement practices.

DESCRIPTION

Our installation is designed as an experiential journey, where participants are invited to explore non-verbal ways of communication and the power of kinaesthetic empathy. We prepared interactive installation, where the sound landscape is shaped by participants breathing patters. We use biosensors and programmed sound synthesisers to enhance feedback of physiological changes of breathing in social interaction exploring how far people may use this extended sense to find common rhythm.

The pre-recorded instruction for participants last 15 minutes and it is looped into continues installation. Participants might join the space in any time, however there is only six breathing sensors available to wear simultaneously, so the installation is meant for a small group. The instruction guides participants through a somatic exploration of senses and embodied feeling, then expanding the focus into others, group and shared activities, coming back into senses and body at the end.

By limiting the amount of light in the space we highlight the usually under used senses and create socially safe environment to play with embodied experience and shared movement. As facilitators we moderate the energy of the room as well as help participants to understand the sensors and its relation to the sound.

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHIES:

Klara Łucznik is a Marie-Curie research fellow at CogNovo, a multinational doctoral training network based at Plymouth University, offering research training in cognitive innovation. She holds MSc. in Psychology (2009, University of Warsaw) and MA in Choreography and Dance Theory (2015, The F. Chopin University of Music). Her research focuses on dance improvisation as a collaborative practice that provides an opportunity to understand how people collaborate while creating and to observe how new ideas appear from interaction with others’ bodies and the environment. In a PhD project she investigates the role of flow in group dance improvisation. Her creative practice explores improvisation as a strategy for creativity, performance and interactive, participatory events.

Abigail Jackson is an MPhil/PhD candidate as part of the Transtechnology Research Group at Plymouth University, and has received AHRC funding via the The 3D3 Centre for Doctoral Training. Abigail also holds a BA Hons Dance Theatre Degree, and a Masters of Research Dance (both achieved at Plymouth University), and a PGCert in Autism (Children) from Birmingham University. Her current research has developed into a multidisciplinary project where she aims to facilitate improvised, responsive, movement sessions, in the development of a creative intervention, for children holding a diagnosis of autism, with digital mediation embedded in its investigation. The progression of this project is aligning with research into the increased connection with technology, for the autistic child, as new technologies are introduced to the schooling, and home, environment.

On Location

Kayla Parker (Plymouth University, UK)

kayla.parker@plymouth.ac.uk

http://www.kaylaparker.co.uk/

ABSTRACT :

A hybrid form of landscape cinema, which observes a year’s cycle of seasonal changes, centred on an unnamed hollow way in a remote area of rural mid-Devon. The film captures meteorological phenomena and the natural world in the sunken lane over a twelve month period, using experimental filming techniques and field recordings made at the site that capture the sonic architecture of the space.

To create the film, we made regular field trips to the location with cameras and sound equipment – these visits allowed us to experience the place during a varied range of weather conditions through winter, spring, summer, and autumn, to respond intuitively using our camera and sound equipment, and then to review and reflect on the recordings we had made. On Location explores the dynamic interrelationship between our engagement with the location, the process of capturing moving image sequences, and the affective interplay between the recordings and our memories through repeated presence and absence at a site that seems both unchanging and in constant flux. Our memories became an integral part of our film-making methodology, which is non-anthropocentric and informed by new materialism, and were an important influence on the form of the completed film.

 

KEYWORDS: artists’ moving image film, landscape location new materialism place

 

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:

Artist film-maker with over twenty years experience as a director-producer, creating innovative, experimental moving image works for cinema, gallery and broadcast television, and a range of corporate clients. The recipient of many awards, her work is shown worldwide across public, gallery and online spaces.

Her research interests centre around subjectivity and place, embodiment and technological mediation, from feminist perspectives, with an interest in the interface between still and moving image, and expanded cinema. In her practice she uses animation, photography, sound, performance, found objects, drawing, and writing, working with film-based and digital technologies to explore the interrelationship between the body and forgotten, liminal spaces. Recent publications include a co-authored chapter in Community Filmmaking: Diversity, Innovation, Policy and Practice, edited by Sarita Malik, Caroline Chapain and Roberta Comunian (Routledge 2017). She is currently working on a chapter about animation created through direct interaction with the environment and elemental forces for an edited volume on experimental animation, to be published by Palgrave Macmillan later this year.

She has worked as a full-time lecturer at Plymouth University since 2008, where she convenes the Moving Image Arts (MIA) research group, leading cinema, moving image, and animation initiatives in partnership with colleagues and cultural organisations.

“Anästetiker”

Evelina Rajca (Fellow at Rijksakademie Amsterdam and PhD candidate at Bauhaus University Weimar Media Study Department, Based in Amsterdam The Netherlands)

evelina.rajca@email.de

http://www.rijksakademie.nl/NL/resident/evelina-rajca

ABSTRACT:

“e-conductor” is an artifact of the research project “Anästetiker” (2012–ongoing) by Evelina Rajca. Within this research project different artifacts show experimentally to what extent the density and aggregate”d” state of matter influences the presumed presence or absence of options for action. Rajca is interested in elaborating different methods in order to figure out “how we can become aware of substances that we do not sense `directly´ but that affect our well-being”.

The various investigation of her long term research culminate in a complex mixed media room installation or they can be shown separately as audiovisual installations. “E-conductor” is a two-channel audiovisual installation. Within the first channel an experiment with solid carbon dioxide (CO2) is presented, which doubles as a compositional sound study. Dry ice is placed in a sealed partial vacuum glass box. A brass pin inside the box strikes and drills through the dry ice. The pressure in the box rises due to the sublimation of dry ice. The needle moves in accordance with the concentration of the gas production. Computers, sensors and detectors steer the process. Inspired by early geoengineering / weather modification experiments – the other channel shows a snowy landscape – crystallizing out of a dry ice cube.

DESCRIPTION:

“e-conductor” is an artifact of the research project “Anästetiker” (2012–ongoing) by Evelina Rajca. Within this research project different artifacts show experimentally to what extent the density and aggregate”d” state of matter influences the presumed presence or absence of options for action. Rajca is interested in elaborating different methods in order to figure out “how we can become aware of substances that we do not sense `directly´ but that affect our well-being”.

The various investigation of her long term research culminate in a complex mixed media room installation or they can be shown separately as audiovisual installations. “E-conductor” is a two-channel audiovisual installation. Within the first channel an experiment with solid carbon dioxide (CO2) is presented, which doubles as a compositional sound study. Dry ice is placed in a sealed partial vacuum glass box. A brass pin inside the box strikes and drills through the dry ice. The pressure in the box rises due to the sublimation of dry ice. The needle moves in accordance with the concentration of the gas production. The sound piece ends with the explosion of the glass vitrine. Computers, sensors and detectors steer the process. Inspired by early geoengineering / weather modification experiments – the other channel shows a snowy landscape – crystallizing out of a dry ice cube.

Solid carbon dioxide, also known as “dry ice,” does not naturally occur on earth, but it is an industrial product used, for example, for the cooling of food. As it changes from solid into gaseous form, there it develops a gas cushion around the carbon dioxide, which, when pressed against a suitable resonating body made of metal, generates extraordinary vibrations. This results in a variety of sounds –cries, sighs, calls of delight and of horror– that are based on different parameters such as volume, surface structure, and temperature of the materials and thus can be deliberately modulated by the instrumentalist. Depending on its density, carbon dioxide has different effects: analgesia –anaesthesia– death. Since the density and aggregate”d” state of a substance determines its level of toxicity, keywords and ideas such as irreversibility and fetish are also of central importance in Evelina Rajca research process “Anästhetiker” and plays a role in another artifact within this project: the sound instrument “fortune teller” made from antique, radioactive uranium glass plates.

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:

Evelina Rajca studied at the Academy of Media Arts in Cologne and at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing. She was recently awarded a fellowship at Rijksakademie in Amsterdam and at Bauhaus University in Weimar. Her practice is based in between intuitive embodied knowledge and different systems that construct processes of documenting these experiences and translating them into interventions, objects, maps, scores. She is interested in both low-tech and high-tech means of production. For example, her research concerning language and its limitation forms the starting point for Speech sound and the direct meeting of minds. Rajca experiments for instance with the moment when noise becomes intelligible information and vice versa, and possibilities to distinguish value systems within this shift in perception. She studies ways to influence states of concentration and the sensory adaptation of living, human and non-human beings, including artificial intelligence. She challenges their physical and mental resilience. Rajca has shown her work internationally and was recently awarded with a Giga-Hertz Prize for Sound Art by the ZKM, an artistic research grant by Stroom, Mondriaan Funds, Van Bijlevelt Fellowship in The Netherlands and the DAAD research Grant for the USA (Stanford University) and Austria (Art University Linz).

 

Smar-ting bodies – reflecting on the surface of fear

Evelina Rajca (Fellow at Rijksakademie Amsterdam and PhD candidate at Bauhaus University Weimar Media Study Department, based in Amsterdam The Netherlands)

evelina.rajca@email.de 

http://www.rijksakademie.nl/NL/resident/evelina-rajca

Rajca is interested in both low-tech and high-tech means of production. For example, her research concerning language and its limitation forms the starting point for `Speech sound and the direct meeting of minds´. Rajca experiments with the moment when noise becomes for instance intelligible information and vice versa, and possibilities to distinguish value systems within this shift in perception. She studies ways to influence states of concentration and the sensory adaptation of living, human and non-human beings, including artificial intelligence. She challenges their physical and mental resilience. For this she works with various types of so called Energy Harvesting and smart materials, currently focusing on glass and piezo electric ceramics. By experimenting with different recipes but also by cultivating her own crystals, she creates new instruments in order to elaborate on questions as What does is mean to be a living being in an era of planetary computation or When does a smart technology shift into a smarting ideology?By keeping ideas in mind as i.e.: ”The AI does not hate you, nor does it love you, but you are made out of atoms which it can use for something else” (Eliezer Yudkowsky – 2006).

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY:

Evelina Rajca studied at the Academy of Media Arts in Cologne and at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing. She was recently awarded a fellowship at Rijksakademie in Amsterdam and at Bauhaus University in Weimar. Her practice is based in between intuitive embodied knowledge and different systems that construct processes of documenting these experiences and translating them into interventions, objects, maps, scores. She is interested in both low-tech and high-tech means of production. For example, her research concerning language and its limitation forms the starting point for Speech sound and the direct meeting of minds. Rajca experiments for instance with the moment when noise becomes intelligible information and vice versa, and possibilities to distinguish value systems within this shift in perception. She studies ways to influence states of concentration and the sensory adaptation of living, human and non-human beings, including artificial intelligence. She challenges their physical and mental resilience. Rajca has shown her work internationally and was recently awarded with a Giga-Hertz Prize for Sound Art by the ZKM, an artistic research grant by Stroom, Mondriaan Funds, Van Bijlevelt Fellowship in The Netherlands and the DAAD research Grant for the USA (Stanford University) and Austria (Art University Linz).